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STAYING FIT AND WELL; HEALTH SERVICES FOR OLDER PEOPLE IN HARINGEY Printed July 2019. This is one of 3 brochures produced by Haringey Over 50s Forum with help from the Deutsche Bank Foundation. For more free copies, or the companion booklets ‘Advice’ and ‘Getting together and interesting things to do’ please contact Haringey Over 50s Forum, c/o 73c Stapleton Hall Road, N4 3QF. Tel. 07853 686212. Website www.ho50s.org.uk Page by page guide:- Doctors 1 Eating right 3 NHS out of hours 1-2 Your weight 4 Dentists 2 Exercise 4 Free health checks 2 Anxiety and depression 6 Continuing health care 2 Diabetes or cancer 7 Foot care 3 NHS complaints and feedback 7 Smoking – how to stop 3 ‘Flu vaccination 8 Safe drinking 3 Keeping warm, cheaper energy 8 Doctors You can get a list of Haringey GPs on www.nhs.uk/Services/Trusts/GPs/DefaultView.aspx?id=89687 If using the internet is difficult for you, ask in a public library. Remember to make sure you’re still signed up with a doctor, maybe a new one, whenever you move. Out of Hours Care Weekend or evening appointments; phone 0330 053 9499; line open 6.30 to 8.30m Monday to Friday or 8am to 8pm weekends and public holidays. You can book if you are registered with ANY Haringey GP. You will then be able to go to one of 4 practices that stay open at those times. The 111 phone line. If you need urgent help out of hours try to avoid overloading 999 unless it’s a life threatening emergency. Dial 111 instead. Produced by Haringey Over 50s Forum STAYING FIT AND WELL; HEALTH SERVICES FOR OLDER PEOPLE IN HARINGEY Printed July 2019. This is one of 3 brochures produced by Haringey Over 50s Forum with help from the Deutsche Bank Foundation. For more free copies, or the companion booklets ‘Advice’ and ‘Getting together and interesting things to do’ please contact Haringey Over 50s Forum, c/o 73c Stapleton Hall Road, N4 3QF. Tel. 07853 686212. Website www.ho50s.org.uk Page by page guide:- Doctors 1 Eating right 3 NHS out of hours 1-2 Your weight 4 Dentists 2 Exercise 4 Free health checks 2 Anxiety and depression 6 Continuing health care 2 Diabetes or cancer 7 Foot care 3 NHS complaints and feedback 7 Smoking – how to stop 3 ‘Flu vaccination 8 Safe drinking 3 Keeping warm, cheaper energy 8 Doctors You can get a list of Haringey GPs on www.nhs.uk/Services/Trusts/GPs/DefaultView.aspx?id=89687 If using the internet is difficult for you, ask in a public library. Remember to make sure you’re still signed up with a doctor, maybe a new one, whenever you move. Out of Hours Care Weekend or evening appointments; phone 0330 053 9499; line open 6.30 to 8.30m Monday to Friday or 8am to 8pm weekends and public holidays. You can book if you are registered with ANY Haringey GP. You will then be able to go to one of 4 practices that stay open at those times. The 111 phone line. If you need urgent help out of hours try to avoid overloading 999 unless it’s a life threatening emergency. Dial 111 instead. Produced by Haringey Over 50s Forum Urgent care centres for things like sprains, broken bones, minor burns, minor head or eye injuries are provided at 4 local hospitals:- Chase Farm Hospital, The Ridgeway, Enfield, Middlesex, EN2 8JL. Tel. 0208 375 2999. Open 8am to 10pm 7 days a week North Middlesex Hospital Urgent Care Centre Entrance in Bridport Road, Edmonton N18 1QX. Tel. 0208 887 2398/ 2544/ 2991. Open 9am to 10pm every day. Whittington Hospital, Magdala Avenue, N19 5NF. Tel. 0207 288 5216/ 5704 Open 8am to 10pm every day. Homerton Hospital, Homerton Row, E9 6SR. Tel. 0208 510 7120 /5900 /5793. Open 7am to midnight weekdays, 8am to midnight weekends. Also at Edmonton NHS Walk-in Centre, Evergreen Primary Care Centre, 1 Smythe Close, N9 0TW. Tel. 0208 887 8355.(weekends and bank holidays only) Pharmacies can provide help for minor problems. Many are open in the evenings or on Sundays and holidays. Find one near you from 0300 311 22 33 or search www.nhs.uk for announcements about opening on particular holiday dates. The ‘Minor Ailment Service’ allows people who don’t pay prescription charges to obtain advice and treatment for common conditions like coughs, colds and tummy upsets from local pharmacies for FREE without needing to visit a GP. Dentists For a list of local dentists see www.haringeyccg.nhs.uk/Services/services-search.htm Free NHS health checks for 40-74 year-olds in Haringey. Get checked out and receive expert advice on maintaining or improving your health. Ask at your GP surgery for this simple test that can help you reduce the risk of developing avoidable health problems, including diabetes, heart disease, kidney disease and dementia. The health check takes about 20 to 30 minutes and consists of some simple questions, blood pressure, height and weight measurements, and a blood test to check your cholesterol. Most GP practices in Haringey have blood pressure machines which are free for use. You can also ask for a blood pressure check at several pharmacies. Continuing Healthcare – care provided outside of hospital NHS continuing healthcare (CHC) is a package of care provided outside of hospital. It is arranged and funded by Clinical Commissioning Groups (CCGs) for people aged 18 years and over who have significant ongoing healthcare needs and have been assessed as having a ‘primary health need’. People who are assessed for CHC include those who need a very high level of support. Some people may be reaching the end of their lives, or have long-term conditions as a result of a disability, accident or illness. When someone is assessed as eligible for CHC, their local CCG is responsible for funding their full package of health and social care. This means that the CCG will find suitable care to meet someone’s assessed needs. The CCG will always try to give options and choices that best match the patient and family’s preferences for the type and place of care provided. For more information see www.haringeyccg.nhs.uk/Services/continuing-healthcare.htm Foot Care The Whittington Hospital near the Archway provides a free foot care service. Make an appointment on 0203 316 1111 or 0203 316 1600. Toe nail cutting (£10) and foot therapy (£10, or both together £15) are also provided by the Bridge Renewal Trust at the Laurels Healthy Living Centre, St Ann’s Road. Tel. 0208 442 7640. How to stop smoking Contact the One You Haringey programme. Save your lungs, avoid a major risk of cancer or heart disease, and save lots of money too! Get support and advice about how to stop. Tel. 0208 885 9095. Website www.ONEYOUHARINGEY.org Safe Drinking Many older people don’t realise they are drinking more than they should do if they want to avoid major health risks like liver disease, heart disease, cancer, depression and anxiety. Booze runs away with your pension too! See the ‘health factsheets’ on www.cdc.gov/alcohol/fact-sheets/alcohol-use.htm. The recommended limit is 14 units a week. A web site, www.dontbottleitup.org.uk tells you how to work out how many units you are drinking, whatever your favourite tipple. It also suggests having several ‘drink free’ days every week. HAGA (Haringey Action on Alcohol and Addiction) can help people reduce or stop drinking. Tel. 0208 800 6999. E-mail hello@haga.co.uk. Website www.haga.co.uk Eating Right Eight tips for healthy eating:- 1. Starchy carbohydrates should make up just over one third of the food you eat. They include potatoes, bread, rice, pasta and cereals. Wholegrain varieties (or potatoes with their skins on) contain more fibre, and can help you feel full for longer. Some people think starchy foods are fattening, but gram for gram the carbohydrate they contain provides fewer than half the calories of fat. 2. Eat lots of fruit and veg – 5 portions a day. 3. Eat at least 2 portions of fish a week, including one oily fish like salmon, herring, mackerel, sardines, trout. 4. Cut down on saturated fats like butter, cream, lard, cheese and in biscuits, cakes, sausages and pies. 5. Eat less salt and sugar, take less alcohol. 6. Keep active and try to have a healthy weight. 7. Drink 6 to 8 glasses of fluid a day – but only one small glass should be fruit juice – avoid sugary and fizzy drinks. 8. People who regularly eat breakfast are less likely to be overweight. Breakfast can be things like cereal with fruit and plain low fat yoghourt – it doesn’t have to be bacon, fried eggs etc. Fruit and vegetables: are you getting your 5 A Day? Fruit and vegetables are a vital source of vitamins and minerals, and should make up just over a third of the food we eat each day. It’s advised that we eat at least 5 portions of a variety of fruit and vegetables every day. There’s evidence that people who eat at least 5 portions a day have a lower risk of heart disease, stroke and some cancers. One portion is an apple, banana, pear or similar-sized fruit (80g). Or a slice of pineapple or melon. Or 3 heaped tablespoons of vegetables. Starchy foods in your diet Starchy foods should make up just over a third of everything we eat. Try to choose wholegrain or wholemeal varieties of starchy foods, such as brown rice, wholewheat pasta and brown, wholemeal or higher fibre white bread. They contain more fibre, and usually more vitamins and minerals, than white varieties. To get more fibre and vitamins from potatoes, eat them with the skins on. Milk and dairy foods: go for lower-fat varieties Milk and dairy foods such as cheese and yoghurt are good sources of protein. They also contain calcium, which helps keep your bones healthy. To enjoy the health benefits of dairy without eating too much fat, use semi-skimmed, 1% fat or skimmed milk, as well as lower-fat hard cheeses or cottage cheese, and lower-fat, plain or lower-sugar yoghurt. Unsweetened calcium-fortified dairy alternatives like soya milks, soya yoghurts and soya cheeses also count as part of this food group and can make good alternatives to dairy products. Beans, pulses, fish, eggs, meat and other proteins These foods are all good sources of protein, which is essential for the body to grow and repair itself. They’re also good sources of a range of vitamins and minerals. Meat is a good source of protein, vitamins and minerals, including iron, zinc and B vitamins. It’s also one of the main sources of vitamin B12. Try to eat lean cuts of meat and skinless poultry to cut down on fat. Always cook meat thoroughly. Fish is another important source of protein, and contains many vitamins and minerals. Oily fish is particularly rich in omega-3 fatty acids. Aim for at least 2 portions of fish a week, including 1 portion of oily fish. Remember that canned and smoked fish can often be high in salt. Eggs and pulses (including beans, nuts and seeds) are also great sources of protein. Nuts are high in fibre and a good alternative to snacks high in saturated fat, but they do still contain high levels of fat, so eat them in moderation. Oils and spreads Some fat in the diet is essential, but should be limited to small amounts. It’s important to get most of our fat from unsaturated oils and spreads. Swapping to unsaturated fats can help lower cholesterol.Eat less saturated fat and sugar Too much saturated fat can increase the amount of cholesterol in the blood, which increases your risk 7. Drink 6 to 8 glasses of fluid a day – but only one small glass should be fruit juice – avoid sugary and fizzy drinks. 8. People who regularly eat breakfast are less likely to be overweight. Breakfast can be things like cereal with fruit and plain low fat yoghourt – it doesn’t have to be bacon, fried eggs etc. Fruit and vegetables: are you getting your 5 A Day? Fruit and vegetables are a vital source of vitamins and minerals, and should make up just over a third of the food we eat each day. It’s advised that we eat at least 5 portions of a variety of fruit and vegetables every day. There’s evidence that people who eat at least 5 portions a day have a lower risk of heart disease, stroke and some cancers. One portion is an apple, banana, pear or similar-sized fruit (80g). Or a slice of pineapple or melon. Or 3 heaped tablespoons of vegetables. Starchy foods in your diet Starchy foods should make up just over a third of everything we eat. Try to choose wholegrain or wholemeal varieties of starchy foods, such as brown rice, wholewheat pasta and brown, wholemeal or higher fibre white bread. They contain more fibre, and usually more vitamins and minerals, than white varieties. To get more fibre and vitamins from potatoes, eat them with the skins on. Milk and dairy foods: go for lower-fat varieties Milk and dairy foods such as cheese and yoghurt are good sources of protein. They also contain calcium, which helps keep your bones healthy. To enjoy the health benefits of dairy without eating too much fat, use semi-skimmed, 1% fat or skimmed milk, as well as lower-fat hard cheeses or cottage cheese, and lower-fat, plain or lower-sugar yoghurt. Unsweetened calcium-fortified dairy alternatives like soya milks, soya yoghurts and soya cheeses also count as part of this food group and can make good alternatives to dairy products. Beans, pulses, fish, eggs, meat and other proteins These foods are all good sources of protein, which is essential for the body to grow and repair itself. They’re also good sources of a range of vitamins and minerals. Meat is a good source of protein, vitamins and minerals, including iron, zinc and B vitamins. It’s also one of the main sources of vitamin B12. Try to eat lean cuts of meat and skinless poultry to cut down on fat. Always cook meat thoroughly. Fish is another important source of protein, and contains many vitamins and minerals. Oily fish is particularly rich in omega-3 fatty acids. Aim for at least 2 portions of fish a week, including 1 portion of oily fish. Remember that canned and smoked fish can often be high in salt. Eggs and pulses (including beans, nuts and seeds) are also great sources of protein. Nuts are high in fibre and a good alternative to snacks high in saturated fat, but they do still contain high levels of fat, so eat them in moderation. Oils and spreads Some fat in the diet is essential, but should be limited to small amounts. It’s important to get most of our fat from unsaturated oils and spreads. Swapping to unsaturated fats can help lower cholesterol.Eat less saturated fat and sugar Too much saturated fat can increase the amount of cholesterol in the blood, which increases your risk of developing heart disease, while regularly consuming foods and drinks high in sugar increases your risk of obesity and tooth decay. Need to lose weight? Most adults in England are overweight or obese. Check whether you’re a healthy weight by working out your BMI (‘body mass index’). The Body Mass Index (BMI) is a person’s weight in kilograms divided by the square of height in metres. For example if you weigh 80kg and you are 1.7m. tall, your BMI is 80/(1.7 x 1.7) = 80/2.89 = 27.68. That’s over 25 so you would need to lose some. Over 30 would be counted as ‘obese’ which is more serious. Exercise – how much and what to do? To stay healthy or to improve health, older adults need to do 2 types of physical activity each week: aerobic exercise and strength exercises. Adults aged 65 or older who are generally fit and have no health conditions that limit their mobility should try to be active daily. When you’ve decided what you need, see our ‘Getting together and interesting things to do’ booklet for places where you can walk, dance, do yoga, do gym or exercise classes etc. You should do at least 150 minutes (2 and a half hours) of moderate aerobic activity such as cycling or walking every week and strength exercises on 2 or more days a week that work all the major muscles (legs, hips, back, abdomen, chest, shoulders and arms). Other examples are water aerobics, ballroom and line dancing, riding a bike on level ground or with few hills, playing doubles tennis, pushing a lawn mower, volleyball. Moderate activity will raise your heart rate and make you breathe faster and feel warmer. Or 75 minutes every week of vigorous aerobic activity such as running or a game of singles tennis and strength exercises on 2 or more days a week that work all the major muscles (legs, hips, back, abdomen, chest, shoulders and arms). Examples include jogging, aerobics, swimming fast, riding a bike fast or on hills, singles tennis, football, hiking uphill, energetic dancing, martial arts. Vigorous activity makes you breathe hard and fast, so you can’t talk much without pausing for breath. Or a mix of moderate and vigorous aerobic activity every week (for example, two 30-minute runs plus 30 minutes of brisk walking equates to 150 minutes of moderate aerobic activity) and strength exercises on 2 or more days a week that work all the major muscles (legs, hips, back, abdomen, chest, shoulders and arms). A general rule of thumb is that 1 minute of vigorous activity provides the same health benefits as 2 minutes of moderate activity. Older adults at risk of falls, such as people with weak legs, poor balance and some medical conditions, should do exercises to improve balance and co-ordination on at least 2 days a week. Examples include yoga, tai chi and dancing. You should also try to break up long periods of sitting with light activity, as sedentary behaviour is now considered an independent risk factor for ill health, no matter how much exercise you do. Daily chores such as shopping, cooking or housework don’t count towards your 150 minutes because the of developing heart disease, while regularly consuming foods and drinks high in sugar increases your risk of obesity and tooth decay. Need to lose weight? Most adults in England are overweight or obese. Check whether you’re a healthy weight by working out your BMI (‘body mass index’). The Body Mass Index (BMI) is a person’s weight in kilograms divided by the square of height in metres. For example if you weigh 80kg and you are 1.7m. tall, your BMI is 80/(1.7 x 1.7) = 80/2.89 = 27.68. That’s over 25 so you would need to lose some. Over 30 would be counted as ‘obese’ which is more serious. Exercise – how much and what to do? To stay healthy or to improve health, older adults need to do 2 types of physical activity each week: aerobic exercise and strength exercises. Adults aged 65 or older who are generally fit and have no health conditions that limit their mobility should try to be active daily. When you’ve decided what you need, see our ‘Getting together and interesting things to do’ booklet for places where you can walk, dance, do yoga, do gym or exercise classes etc. You should do at least 150 minutes (2 and a half hours) of moderate aerobic activity such as cycling or walking every week and strength exercises on 2 or more days a week that work all the major muscles (legs, hips, back, abdomen, chest, shoulders and arms). Other examples are water aerobics, ballroom and line dancing, riding a bike on level ground or with few hills, playing doubles tennis, pushing a lawn mower, volleyball. Moderate activity will raise your heart rate and make you breathe faster and feel warmer. Or 75 minutes every week of vigorous aerobic activity such as running or a game of singles tennis and strength exercises on 2 or more days a week that work all the major muscles (legs, hips, back, abdomen, chest, shoulders and arms). Examples include jogging, aerobics, swimming fast, riding a bike fast or on hills, singles tennis, football, hiking uphill, energetic dancing, martial arts. Vigorous activity makes you breathe hard and fast, so you can’t talk much without pausing for breath. Or a mix of moderate and vigorous aerobic activity every week (for example, two 30-minute runs plus 30 minutes of brisk walking equates to 150 minutes of moderate aerobic activity) and strength exercises on 2 or more days a week that work all the major muscles (legs, hips, back, abdomen, chest, shoulders and arms). A general rule of thumb is that 1 minute of vigorous activity provides the same health benefits as 2 minutes of moderate activity. Older adults at risk of falls, such as people with weak legs, poor balance and some medical conditions, should do exercises to improve balance and co-ordination on at least 2 days a week. Examples include yoga, tai chi and dancing. You should also try to break up long periods of sitting with light activity, as sedentary behaviour is now considered an independent risk factor for ill health, no matter how much exercise you do. Daily chores such as shopping, cooking or housework don’t count towards your 150 minutes because the of developing heart disease, while regularly consuming foods and drinks high in sugar increases your risk of obesity and tooth decay. Need to lose weight? Most adults in England are overweight or obese. Check whether you’re a healthy weight by working out your BMI (‘body mass index’). The Body Mass Index (BMI) is a person’s weight in kilograms divided by the square of height in metres. For example if you weigh 80kg and you are 1.7m. tall, your BMI is 80/(1.7 x 1.7) = 80/2.89 = 27.68. That’s over 25 so you would need to lose some. Over 30 would be counted as ‘obese’ which is more serious. Exercise – how much and what to do? To stay healthy or to improve health, older adults need to do 2 types of physical activity each week: aerobic exercise and strength exercises. Adults aged 65 or older who are generally fit and have no health conditions that limit their mobility should try to be active daily. When you’ve decided what you need, see our ‘Getting together and interesting things to do’ booklet for places where you can walk, dance, do yoga, do gym or exercise classes etc. You should do at least 150 minutes (2 and a half hours) of moderate aerobic activity such as cycling or walking every week and strength exercises on 2 or more days a week that work all the major muscles (legs, hips, back, abdomen, chest, shoulders and arms). Other examples are water aerobics, ballroom and line dancing, riding a bike on level ground or with few hills, playing doubles tennis, pushing a lawn mower, volleyball. Moderate activity will raise your heart rate and make you breathe faster and feel warmer. Or 75 minutes every week of vigorous aerobic activity such as running or a game of singles tennis and strength exercises on 2 or more days a week that work all the major muscles (legs, hips, back, abdomen, chest, shoulders and arms). Examples include jogging, aerobics, swimming fast, riding a bike fast or on hills, singles tennis, football, hiking uphill, energetic dancing, martial arts. Vigorous activity makes you breathe hard and fast, so you can’t talk much without pausing for breath. Or a mix of moderate and vigorous aerobic activity every week (for example, two 30-minute runs plus 30 minutes of brisk walking equates to 150 minutes of moderate aerobic activity) and strength exercises on 2 or more days a week that work all the major muscles (legs, hips, back, abdomen, chest, shoulders and arms). A general rule of thumb is that 1 minute of vigorous activity provides the same health benefits as 2 minutes of moderate activity. Older adults at risk of falls, such as people with weak legs, poor balance and some medical conditions, should do exercises to improve balance and co-ordination on at least 2 days a week. Examples include yoga, tai chi and dancing. You should also try to break up long periods of sitting with light activity, as sedentary behaviour is now considered an independent risk factor for ill health, no matter how much exercise you do. Daily chores such as shopping, cooking or housework don’t count towards your 150 minutes because the effort isn’t enough to raise your heart rate. But this type of activity is still important, as it breaks up periods of sitting. What activities strengthen muscles? Muscle-strengthening exercise is necessary for strong bones, regulating blood sugar and blood pressure, all daily movement and maintaining a healthy weight. For each muscle strength exercise, like sit-ups, try to do 8 to 12 repetitions. You can do exercises at home or in a gym. Examples of muscle-strengthening activities include carrying or moving heavy loads, such as groceries, activities that involve stepping and jumping, such as dancing, heavy gardening, such as digging or shovelling, exercises that use your body weight for resistance, such as push-ups or sit-ups, yoga, pilates, lifting weights Remember there is free access for the over-65s to the gyms, swimming pools and classes in some local council supported leisure centres on weekdays between 9am-5pm. That’s Tottenham Green, Park Road N8, and Broadwater Farm. In Haringey the ‘Active for Life’ is a programme designed to help inactive people to become more physically active. It’s a 12 week programme to help people with various chronic conditions like diabetes, heart or blood pressure problems, being overweight or having mental health issues. You need to be referred by your GP or a practice nurse. Anxiety and depression Crisis and emergency service. This service is there to support people who are experiencing a mental health crisis and who need help quickly. The service can be accessed through your GP, by calling 111 or on 0208 702 6700. Lines are open 24 hours, 7 days a week: The Samaritans E-mail jo@samaritans.org Tel. 116 123 The phone number 116 123 is free to call from both landlines and mobiles, including pay-as-you-go mobiles. You do not need to have any credit or call allowance on your plan to call. Samaritans offer a safe place to talk whenever you like. They won’t judge or tell you what to do, just listen. Stress and depression Psychological causes of feeling tired or sleepless include stress, emotional shock (like as bereavement, for example) or depression. Most people experience feelings of stress, unhappiness or anxiety during difficult times. A low mood may improve after a short period of time, rather than being a sign of depression. Symptoms of depression can include the following:- low mood lasting 2 weeks or more, not getting any enjoyment out of life, feeling hopeless, feeling tired or lacking energy, not being able to concentrate on everyday things like reading the paper or watching television, comfort eating or losing your appetite, sleeping more than usual or being unable to sleep, having suicidal thoughts or thoughts about harming yourself. If you’re still feeling down after a couple of weeks, talk to your GP or call NHS 111. Your GP can discuss your symptoms with you and make a diagnosis. There are several types of talking therapies available. Talk to your GP . effort isn’t enough to raise your heart rate. But this type of activity is still important, as it breaks up periods of sitting. What activities strengthen muscles? Muscle-strengthening exercise is necessary for strong bones, regulating blood sugar and blood pressure, all daily movement and maintaining a healthy weight. For each muscle strength exercise, like sit-ups, try to do 8 to 12 repetitions. You can do exercises at home or in a gym. Examples of muscle-strengthening activities include carrying or moving heavy loads, such as groceries, activities that involve stepping and jumping, such as dancing, heavy gardening, such as digging or shovelling, exercises that use your body weight for resistance, such as push-ups or sit-ups, yoga, pilates, lifting weights Remember there is free access for the over-65s to the gyms, swimming pools and classes in some local council supported leisure centres on weekdays between 9am-5pm. That’s Tottenham Green, Park Road N8, and Broadwater Farm. In Haringey the ‘Active for Life’ is a programme designed to help inactive people to become more physically active. It’s a 12 week programme to help people with various chronic conditions like diabetes, heart or blood pressure problems, being overweight or having mental health issues. You need to be referred by your GP or a practice nurse. Anxiety and depression Crisis and emergency service. This service is there to support people who are experiencing a mental health crisis and who need help quickly. The service can be accessed through your GP, by calling 111 or on 0208 702 6700. Lines are open 24 hours, 7 days a week: The Samaritans E-mail jo@samaritans.org Tel. 116 123 The phone number 116 123 is free to call from both landlines and mobiles, including pay-as-you-go mobiles. You do not need to have any credit or call allowance on your plan to call. Samaritans offer a safe place to talk whenever you like. They won’t judge or tell you what to do, just listen. Stress and depression Psychological causes of feeling tired or sleepless include stress, emotional shock (like as bereavement, for example) or depression. Most people experience feelings of stress, unhappiness or anxiety during difficult times. A low mood may improve after a short period of time, rather than being a sign of depression. Symptoms of depression can include the following:- low mood lasting 2 weeks or more, not getting any enjoyment out of life, feeling hopeless, feeling tired or lacking energy, not being able to concentrate on everyday things like reading the paper or watching television, comfort eating or losing your appetite, sleeping more than usual or being unable to sleep, having suicidal thoughts or thoughts about harming yourself. If you’re still feeling down after a couple of weeks, talk to your GP or call NHS 111. Your GP can discuss your symptoms with you and make a diagnosis. There are several types of talking therapies available. Talk to your GP . Self-help like keeping to a healthy diet, and getting regular exercise, can help you feel more in control and more able to cope. Look for self-help books in your library about meditation, breathing exercises and learning ways to think about problems differently. Or here are some sources of help to which you can refer yourself:- Let’s-Talk IAPT service can help people with their depression and anxiety difficulties. IAPT stands for Improving Access to Psychological Therapies. You can self-refer by completing a form on the website on www.lets-talk-iapt.nhs.uk/self-referral/ Or you can ask a friend or your GP to fill it in. The service will contact you within two weeks. This will be to arrange an initial assessment by telephone, at a time that suits you best. Please note that your GP will be contacted to keep them informed of your referral and the work ‘Let’s Talk’ is doing with you. Mind in Haringey; 73c Stapleton Hall Road , N4 3QF. Tel. 0208 340 2474. E-mail admin@mih.org.uk MIND’s services for people in emotional or mental distress, or suffering from anxiety or depression. include:- The Haringey Wellbeing Network , a group of voluntary organisations that aim to empower people towards better mental and physical wellbeing and to alleviate issues such as stress, anxiety, low mood, and loneliness and isolation. The Wellbeing Network works with clients to agree goals and a programme of activities to help make positive changes. It is suitable for people who are motivated to make changes in their lives and usually feel able to attend and take part in groups. The help offered includes brief interventions which support clients to manage their illness and their personal or social circumstances, signposting to community groups and activities, information and time limited advocacy, referral to other services, and wellbeing support plans up to 3 months. This supports people to make sustainable changes to their lives and so improve their wellbeing. Individual counselling, including bereavement counselling is also offered through MIND. There may sometimes be a waiting list. Feeling tired or sleeplessness ? We all feel tired from time to time. But tiredness or exhaustion that goes on for a long time is not normal. It can affect your ability to get on and enjoy your life. Before you see a GP, you may want to work out how you became tired in the first place. It can be helpful to think about parts of your life, such as work and family, that might be particularly tiring, including events such as bereavement or a relationship break-up; or how your lifestyle may be making you tired Diabetes There is a 7 weeks diabetes self –management programme for people with type 2 diabetes at Whittington Health NHS. For more information 0207 527 1707 . The Whittington Health NHS also provide courses such as living healthy and feel more in control (free 6 weeks expert Patients program Cancer Macmillan Cancer Support is one of the largest British charities and provides specialist health care, information and financial support to people affected by cancer. The Macmillan Support Line can help with clinical, practical and financial information. Tel. 0808 808 0000 (8am-8pm, 7 days a week). Self-help like keeping to a healthy diet, and getting regular exercise, can help you feel more in control and more able to cope. Look for self-help books in your library about meditation, breathing exercises and learning ways to think about problems differently. Or here are some sources of help to which you can refer yourself:- Let’s-Talk IAPT service can help people with their depression and anxiety difficulties. IAPT stands for Improving Access to Psychological Therapies. You can self-refer by completing a form on the website on www.lets-talk-iapt.nhs.uk/self-referral/ Or you can ask a friend or your GP to fill it in. The service will contact you within two weeks. This will be to arrange an initial assessment by telephone, at a time that suits you best. Please note that your GP will be contacted to keep them informed of your referral and the work ‘Let’s Talk’ is doing with you. Mind in Haringey; 73c Stapleton Hall Road , N4 3QF. Tel. 0208 340 2474. E-mail admin@mih.org.uk MIND’s services for people in emotional or mental distress, or suffering from anxiety or depression. include:- The Haringey Wellbeing Network , a group of voluntary organisations that aim to empower people towards better mental and physical wellbeing and to alleviate issues such as stress, anxiety, low mood, and loneliness and isolation. The Wellbeing Network works with clients to agree goals and a programme of activities to help make positive changes. It is suitable for people who are motivated to make changes in their lives and usually feel able to attend and take part in groups. The help offered includes brief interventions which support clients to manage their illness and their personal or social circumstances, signposting to community groups and activities, information and time limited advocacy, referral to other services, and wellbeing support plans up to 3 months. This supports people to make sustainable changes to their lives and so improve their wellbeing. Individual counselling, including bereavement counselling is also offered through MIND. There may sometimes be a waiting list. Feeling tired or sleeplessness ? We all feel tired from time to time. But tiredness or exhaustion that goes on for a long time is not normal. It can affect your ability to get on and enjoy your life. Before you see a GP, you may want to work out how you became tired in the first place. It can be helpful to think about parts of your life, such as work and family, that might be particularly tiring, including events such as bereavement or a relationship break-up; or how your lifestyle may be making you tired Diabetes There is a 7 weeks diabetes self –management programme for people with type 2 diabetes at Whittington Health NHS. For more information 0207 527 1707 . The Whittington Health NHS also provide courses such as living healthy and feel more in control (free 6 weeks expert Patients program Cancer Macmillan Cancer Support is one of the largest British charities and provides specialist health care, information and financial support to people affected by cancer. The Macmillan Support Line can help with clinical, practical and financial information. Tel. 0808 808 0000 (8am-8pm, 7 days a week). Complaints …and positive ideas too Healthwatch Haringey is the independent consumer watchdog for health and social care. It can help you to find out information about local health and social care services, such as finding a new GP or NHS dentist, and help you to make a complaint if you are unhappy with the care or treatment you have received. Healthwatch will also listen to your experiences of healthcare and positive suggestions for improvement of NHS services. Tel. 0208 888 0579 E-mail info@healthwatchharingey.org.uk. Website www.healthwatchharingey.org.uk POhWER Tel. 0203 553 5960. E-mail London IHCAS@pohwer.net This service provides the statutory Independent Health Complaints Advocacy Service in London. It’s free and shows you how to use NHS complaints procedures. Patient participation groups are the way patients can give their GP practice feedback. Any GP surgery should have one and any patient can join. Ask the receptionist. Flu Vaccination Flu is a virus and antibiotics don’t cure it. Over 65s can get a free vaccination every autumn from their GP or some pharmacies. Younger people who are vulnerable or who are carers may also be able to get it free. Ask your GP. Keeping Warm Heat your home to at least 65 degrees Fahrenheit (18 Centigrade) if you can. If that’s expensive, try draught-proofing. Expert advice is available from the Muswell Hill Sustainability Group – see www.mhsgroup.org/our-products/ . Contact them on the internet if you can. But you could also write to Mary Blake, 14a Beech Road, N11 2DA. If you claim benefits there are government grants to help with the cost of roof insulation – or improving your central heating system. See www.gov.uk/energy-company-obligation . LEAP, the Local Energy Advice Partnership, an energy- and money- saving service, offers a home visit to advise you how to minimise your energy bills. Tel. 0800 060 7567. Or www.applyforleap.org.uk Warm Home Discount Scheme If you claim the ‘guarantee’ element of pension credit you could get £140 off your electricity bill for winter 2018 to 2019 under the Warm Home Discount Scheme. The money is not paid to you – it’s a one-off discount on your electricity bill, between September and March. You may be able to get the discount on your gas bill instead if your supplier provides you with both gas and electricity. Contact your supplier to find out. Winter Fuel Allowance Anyone on a state retirement pension should get the Winter Fuel Allowance. It should be paid automatically each winter, but if you don’t get a letter about it by November, call 0800 731 0160. It’s £200 or £100 each for a pensioner couple, or £300 if you were born before 23.9.1938. The ‘Big Switch’ – Tel. 0800 048 8285 to check you’re getting the best electricity and gas tariffs. The Council has arranged some bargains on bigcommunityswitch.ichoosr.com/Product/index.rails?&utm_medium=web&location=haringey Complaints …and positive ideas too Healthwatch Haringey is the independent consumer watchdog for health and social care. It can help you to find out information about local health and social care services, such as finding a new GP or NHS dentist, and help you to make a complaint if you are unhappy with the care or treatment you have received. Healthwatch will also listen to your experiences of healthcare and positive suggestions for improvement of NHS services. Tel. 0208 888 0579 E-mail info@healthwatchharingey.org.uk. Website www.healthwatchharingey.org.uk POhWER Tel. 0203 553 5960. E-mail London IHCAS@pohwer.net This service provides the statutory Independent Health Complaints Advocacy Service in London. It’s free and shows you how to use NHS complaints procedures. Patient participation groups are the way patients can give their GP practice feedback. Any GP surgery should have one and any patient can join. Ask the receptionist. Flu Vaccination Flu is a virus and antibiotics don’t cure it. Over 65s can get a free vaccination every autumn from their GP or some pharmacies. Younger people who are vulnerable or who are carers may also be able to get it free. Ask your GP. Keeping Warm Heat your home to at least 65 degrees Fahrenheit (18 Centigrade) if you can. If that’s expensive, try draught-proofing. Expert advice is available from the Muswell Hill Sustainability Group – see www.mhsgroup.org/our-products/ . Contact them on the internet if you can. But you could also write to Mary Blake, 14a Beech Road, N11 2DA. If you claim benefits there are government grants to help with the cost of roof insulation – or improving your central heating system. See www.gov.uk/energy-company-obligation . LEAP, the Local Energy Advice Partnership, an energy- and money- saving service, offers a home visit to advise you how to minimise your energy bills. Tel. 0800 060 7567. Or www.applyforleap.org.uk Warm Home Discount Scheme If you claim the ‘guarantee’ element of pension credit you could get £140 off your electricity bill for winter 2018 to 2019 under the Warm Home Discount Scheme. The money is not paid to you – it’s a one-off discount on your electricity bill, between September and March. You may be able to get the discount on your gas bill instead if your supplier provides you with both gas and electricity. Contact your supplier to find out. Winter Fuel Allowance Anyone on a state retirement pension should get the Winter Fuel Allowance. It should be paid automatically each winter, but if you don’t get a letter about it by November, call 0800 731 0160. It’s £200 or £100 each for a pensioner couple, or £300 if you were born before 23.9.1938. The ‘Big Switch’ – Tel. 0800 048 8285 to check you’re getting the best electricity and gas tariffs. The Council has arranged some bargains on bigcommunityswitch.ichoosr.com/Product/index.rails?&utm_medium=web&location=haringey